Category: dave scott

The prime crew of the Apollo 9 space mission a…

The prime crew of the Apollo 9 space mission are seen inside an Apollo command module boilerplate during water egress training activity in the Gulf of Mexico. From foreground, are astronauts Jim McDivitt, commander; Dave Scott, command module pilot; and Rusty Schweickart, lunar module pilot.

(11 Dec. 1968) — Astronaut Russell L. Sc…

(11 Dec. 1968) — Astronaut Russell L. Schweickart, lunar module pilot of the Apollo 9 space mission, is seen inside Chamber “A,” Space Environment Simulation Laboratory, Building 32, participating in dry run activity in preparation for extravehicular activity which is scheduled in Chamber “A.” The purpose of the scheduled training is to familiarize the crewmen with the operation of EVA equipment in a simulated space environment. In addition, metabolic and workload profiles will be simulated on each crewman. Astronauts Schweickart and Alan L. Bean, backup lunar module pilot, are scheduled to receive thermal-vacuum training simulating Earth-orbital EVA.

David Scott, in full spacesuit, holds maneuver…

David Scott, in full spacesuit, holds maneuvering unit while suspended in a weightless state during extravehicular activity (EVA) training in a C-135 Air Force plane.

An oblique view of an area of the lunar farsid…

An oblique view of an area of the lunar farside, looking southward, as photographed from the Apollo 15 spacecraft in lunar orbit. The crater Zelinsky is in the near foreground at the edge of the picture. The circular, mare-like area in the center is the crater Thomson. Thomson is almost completely surrounded by Mare Ingenii. The approximate coordinates of the center of Thomson are 166 degrees east longitude and 32.2 degrees south latitude.

A view of the Apollo 15 Command and Service Mo…

A view of the Apollo 15 Command and Service Modules in lunar orbit as photographed from the Lunar Module just after rendezvous. The lunar nearside is in the background is looking southeast into the Sea of Fertility. The crater Taruntius is at the right center edge of the picture.

View of the Apollo 9 Lunar Module, in a lunar …

View of the Apollo 9 Lunar Module, in a lunar lading configuration, as photographed from the Command and Service Modules on the fifth day of the Apollo 9 Earth-orbital mission. The landing gear on the LM has been deployed. and inside were astronauts Jim McDivitt, commander and Rusty Schweickart, lunar module pilot.

LMP Russell L. Schweickart operates a 70mm Has…

LMP Russell L. Schweickart operates a 70mm Hasselblad camera during his EVA on the fourth day of the Apollo 9 Earth-orbital mission. This picture was taken by CMP David Scott from the hatch of the Command Module. 

(30 July 1971) — An overall, wide-angle …

(30 July 1971) — An overall, wide-angle lens view of the activity in the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center during the landing of the Apollo 15 Lunar Module on the moon. The LM “Falcon,” with astronauts David R. Scott and James B. Irwin aboard, touched down on the lunar surface at ground elapsed time of 104 hours 42 minutes 29 seconds.

(7 Aug. 1971) — The Apollo 15 Command Mo…

(7 Aug. 1971) — The Apollo 15 Command Module (CM), with astronauts David R. Scott, commander; Alfred M. Worden, command module pilot; and James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot, aboard safely touches down in the mid-Pacific Ocean to conclude a highly successful lunar landing mission. Although causing no harm to the crew men, one of the three main parachutes failed to function properly. The splashdown occurred at 3:45:53 p.m. (CDT), Aug. 7, 1971, some 330 miles north of Honolulu, Hawaii. The three astronauts were picked up by helicopter and flown to the prime recovery ship, USS Okinawa, which was only 6 ½ miles away.

(3 March 1969) — The Apollo 9 crew leave…

(3 March 1969) — The Apollo 9 crew leaves the Kennedy Space Center’s Manned Spacecraft Operations Building during the Apollo 9 prelaunch countdown. Leading is astronaut James A. McDivitt, commander; followed by astronaut David R. Scott, command module pilot; and Russell L. Schweickart, lunar module pilot. Moments later they entered the special transfer van which transported them to their waiting spacecraft at Pad A, Launch Complex 39. Apollo 9 was launched at 11 a.m. (EST), March 3, 1969, on a 10-day Earth-orbital mission.