Category: gene Cernan

Here’s some of my favorite pictures of my favo…

Here’s some of my favorite pictures of my favorite astronauts in no particular order since today marks six years since I’ve wanted to become one of them and yeah I just love them a lot so enjoy

gusgrissom: Happy birthday, Geno (March 14, 1…

gusgrissom:

Happy birthday, Geno (March 14, 1934 – January 16, 2017) ❤️

And I felt that the world has too much purpose, too much logic. It was just too beautiful to happen by accident. There has to be somebody bigger than you and bigger than me.”

Regular

officialundertaker:

illaminati:

mcporno:

there has never been a cool person called eugene

image

image

Geno and Ron talk to George Abbey in Mission C…

Geno and Ron talk to George Abbey in Mission Control during Apollo 16

Gene Cernan and his ace copilot.

Gene Cernan and his ace copilot.

gusgrissom:

gusgrissom:

Apollo 17 commander Gene Cernan with pad leader Guenter Wendt at a post-flight reception in the VAB, February 1973. What a decade for fashion.

gusgrissom: Happy birthday, Geno (March 14, 19…

gusgrissom:

Happy birthday, Geno (March 14, 1934 – January 16, 2017) ❤️

And I felt that the world has too much purpose, too much logic. It was just too beautiful to happen by accident. There has to be somebody bigger than you and bigger than me.”

Gene Cernan

Gene Cernan

This photograph of the moon was taken after tr…

This photograph of the moon was taken after trans-Earth insertion when the Apollo 10 spacecraft was high above the lunar equator near 27 degrees east longitude. North is about 20 degrees left of the top of the photograph. Apollo Landing Site 3 is on the lighted side of the terminator in a dark area just north of the equator. Apollo Landing Site 2 is near the lower left margin of the Sea of Tranquility (Mare Tranquillitatis), which is the large, dark area near the center of the photograph.

(14 Dec. 1972) — An excellent view of th…

(14 Dec. 1972) — An excellent view of the Apollo 17 Command and Service Modules (CSM) photographed from the Lunar Module (LM) “Challenger” during rendezvous and docking maneuvers in lunar orbit. The LM ascent stage, with astronauts Eugene A. Cernan and Harrison H. Schmitt aboard, had just returned from the Taurus-Littrow landing site on the lunar surface. Astronaut Ronald E. Evans remained with the CSM in lunar orbit. Note the exposed Scientific Instrument Module (SIM) Bay in Sector 1 of the Service Module (SM). Three experiments are carried in the SIM bay: S-209 lunar sounder, S-171 infrared scanning spectrometer, and the S-169 far-ultraviolet spectrometer. Also mounted in the SIM bay are the panoramic camera, mapping camera and laser altimeter used in service module photographic tasks. A portion of the LM is on the right.