Category: gene Cernan

gusgrissom:

gusgrissom:

Apollo 17 commander Gene Cernan with pad leader Guenter Wendt at a post-flight reception in the VAB, February 1973. What a decade for fashion.

gusgrissom: Happy birthday, Geno (March 14, 19…

gusgrissom:

Happy birthday, Geno (March 14, 1934 – January 16, 2017) ❤️

And I felt that the world has too much purpose, too much logic. It was just too beautiful to happen by accident. There has to be somebody bigger than you and bigger than me.”

Gene Cernan

Gene Cernan

This photograph of the moon was taken after tr…

This photograph of the moon was taken after trans-Earth insertion when the Apollo 10 spacecraft was high above the lunar equator near 27 degrees east longitude. North is about 20 degrees left of the top of the photograph. Apollo Landing Site 3 is on the lighted side of the terminator in a dark area just north of the equator. Apollo Landing Site 2 is near the lower left margin of the Sea of Tranquility (Mare Tranquillitatis), which is the large, dark area near the center of the photograph.

(14 Dec. 1972) — An excellent view of th…

(14 Dec. 1972) — An excellent view of the Apollo 17 Command and Service Modules (CSM) photographed from the Lunar Module (LM) “Challenger” during rendezvous and docking maneuvers in lunar orbit. The LM ascent stage, with astronauts Eugene A. Cernan and Harrison H. Schmitt aboard, had just returned from the Taurus-Littrow landing site on the lunar surface. Astronaut Ronald E. Evans remained with the CSM in lunar orbit. Note the exposed Scientific Instrument Module (SIM) Bay in Sector 1 of the Service Module (SM). Three experiments are carried in the SIM bay: S-209 lunar sounder, S-171 infrared scanning spectrometer, and the S-169 far-ultraviolet spectrometer. Also mounted in the SIM bay are the panoramic camera, mapping camera and laser altimeter used in service module photographic tasks. A portion of the LM is on the right.

One of the Apollo 17 crew photographed this vi…

One of the Apollo 17 crew photographed this view during lunar surface extravehicular activities at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. The Lunar Rover Vehicle , which was used extensively by astronauts Gene Cernan and Jack Schmitt, is visible in the background.

The Apollo 10 crew leaves the Kennedy Space Ce…

The Apollo 10 crew leaves the Kennedy Space Center’s Manned Spacecraft Operations Building during the Apollo 10 prelaunch countdown. Leading is John Young, command module pilot, followed by Tom Stafford, commander; and Gene Cernan, lunar module pilot. The transfer van carried them over to Pad B, Launch Complex 39, where their spacecraft awaited them. Liftoff for the lunar orbit mission was at 12:49 p.m., May 18, 1969.

The first stage of the Saturn 505 launch vehic…

The first stage of the Saturn 505 launch vehicle being prepared for erection in the high bay area of the Kennedy Space Center’s  Vehicle Assembly Building. Saturn 505 is the launch vehicle for the Apollo 10 mission.

A ground-level view of the huge Apollo 17 spac…

A ground-level view of the huge Apollo 17 space vehicle leaving the Vehicle Assembly Building on its way to Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center. The Saturn V stack and its mobile launch tower are atop a mammoth crawler-transporter.

(14 Dec. 1972) — This 70mm view of the L…

(14 Dec. 1972) — This 70mm view of the Lunar Module (LM) “Challenger” in lunar orbit before rendezvous with the Apollo 17 Command and Service Modules (CSM). While astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, commander, and Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot, descended in the Challenger to explore the Taurus-Littrow region of the moon, astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, remained with the CSM “America” in lunar orbit.