Category: Jim Irwin

gusgrissom: Busy day of astronaut birthdays! H…

gusgrissom:

Busy day of astronaut birthdays! Happy birthday to…

James Benson “Jim” Irwin (March 17, 1930 – August 8, 1991), the LMP on Apollo 15, who would’ve been 88 today. Jim was the eighth man to walk on the moon and the first (and youngest) moonwalker to pass away.

Thomas Kenneth “Ken” Mattingly II (born March 17, 1936), original CMP for Apollo 13, CMP on Apollo 16, and commander of STS-4 and STS-51-C, who turns 82 today!

Kalpana “K.C.” Chawla (March 17, 1962 – February 1, 2003), mission specialist on STS-87 and STS-107 and the first Indian woman in space, who would’ve turned 56 years old today.

An oblique view of an area of the lunar farsid…

An oblique view of an area of the lunar farside, looking southward, as photographed from the Apollo 15 spacecraft in lunar orbit. The crater Zelinsky is in the near foreground at the edge of the picture. The circular, mare-like area in the center is the crater Thomson. Thomson is almost completely surrounded by Mare Ingenii. The approximate coordinates of the center of Thomson are 166 degrees east longitude and 32.2 degrees south latitude.

A view of the Apollo 15 Command and Service Mo…

A view of the Apollo 15 Command and Service Modules in lunar orbit as photographed from the Lunar Module just after rendezvous. The lunar nearside is in the background is looking southeast into the Sea of Fertility. The crater Taruntius is at the right center edge of the picture.

(30 July 1971) — An overall, wide-angle …

(30 July 1971) — An overall, wide-angle lens view of the activity in the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center during the landing of the Apollo 15 Lunar Module on the moon. The LM “Falcon,” with astronauts David R. Scott and James B. Irwin aboard, touched down on the lunar surface at ground elapsed time of 104 hours 42 minutes 29 seconds.

(7 Aug. 1971) — The Apollo 15 Command Mo…

(7 Aug. 1971) — The Apollo 15 Command Module (CM), with astronauts David R. Scott, commander; Alfred M. Worden, command module pilot; and James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot, aboard safely touches down in the mid-Pacific Ocean to conclude a highly successful lunar landing mission. Although causing no harm to the crew men, one of the three main parachutes failed to function properly. The splashdown occurred at 3:45:53 p.m. (CDT), Aug. 7, 1971, some 330 miles north of Honolulu, Hawaii. The three astronauts were picked up by helicopter and flown to the prime recovery ship, USS Okinawa, which was only 6 ½ miles away.

(2 Aug. 1971) — The Apollo 15 Lunar Modu…

(2 Aug. 1971) — The Apollo 15 Lunar Module (LM) “Falcon” is seen only seconds before ascent stage liftoff in this color reproduction taken from a transmission made by the RCA color television camera mounted on the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV). The LRV was parked about 300 feet east of the LM. The LRV-mounted TV camera, remotely controlled from the Mission Control Center (MCC), made it possible for people on Earth to watch the LM’s launch from the moon. The LM liftoff was at 171:37 ground elapsed time. The “Falcon” ascent stage, with astronauts David R. Scott, commander; and James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot, aboard, returned from the lunar surface to rejoin the Command and Service Modules (CSM) orbiting the moon. Astronaut Alfred M. Worden, command module pilot, remained with the CSM in lunar orbit while Scott and Irwin explored the moon. The LM descent stage is used as a launching platform and remains behind on the moon. This is part one of a four-part sequence.

Lunar Landing Sites of the Apollo Missions 

Lunar Landing Sites of the Apollo Missions 

(11-12 March 1971) — A wide-angle view s…

(11-12 March 1971) — A wide-angle view showing two members of the prime crew of the Apollo 15 lunar landing mission riding in a Lunar Roving Vehicle trainer called “Grover” during a simulation of lunar surface extravehicular activity in the Taos, New Mexico area. They are astronauts David R. Scott (riding in left side seat), commander; and James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot. Apollo 15 will be the first mission to the moon to carry a Lunar Roving Vehicle, which will permit the astronauts to cover a larger area for exploration and sample collecting than on previous missions.

humanoidhistory:TODAY IN HISTORY: Apollo 15 astronaut Dave Scott…

humanoidhistory:

TODAY IN HISTORY: Apollo 15 astronaut Dave Scott and Jim Irwin (top to bottom) give a salute next to the flag, August 1, 1971. (NASA)

humanoidhistory: Apollo 15 astronauts Jim Irwin, Al Worden, and…

humanoidhistory:

Apollo 15 astronauts Jim Irwin, Al Worden, and Dave Scott pose in their Corvettes with the training version of the lunar rover in the foreground. Awesome, no? Dave Scott looks back on this photo shoot in a 2005 email: “As I recall, this particular photo of the corvettes was taken out by the launch pad. The corvettes were stylized to essentially show the flag and set a bit of unit pride …primarily to let the troops know that we were about and paying attention to all they were doing; e.g., at almost any level of the launch complex one could look down and recognize the crew’s cars; we went to the pad often for various spacecraft activities as well as to just say hello to the folks putting the Saturn V and its payload together. Awareness, you know, something like the MFAP (Manned Flight Awareness Program, which awarded Snoopy pins to Apollo people who make special contributions. But promoting GM we were not; to own a car at the Cape was much more effective for us and less expensive to NASA than renting a car. Besides, they were fun to drive. I finally sold mine to Ed Fendell who I understand drove it many miles over many years.”

(NASA)