Category: john young

This photograph of the moon was taken after tr…

This photograph of the moon was taken after trans-Earth insertion when the Apollo 10 spacecraft was high above the lunar equator near 27 degrees east longitude. North is about 20 degrees left of the top of the photograph. Apollo Landing Site 3 is on the lighted side of the terminator in a dark area just north of the equator. Apollo Landing Site 2 is near the lower left margin of the Sea of Tranquility (Mare Tranquillitatis), which is the large, dark area near the center of the photograph.

The Apollo 10 crew leaves the Kennedy Space Ce…

The Apollo 10 crew leaves the Kennedy Space Center’s Manned Spacecraft Operations Building during the Apollo 10 prelaunch countdown. Leading is John Young, command module pilot, followed by Tom Stafford, commander; and Gene Cernan, lunar module pilot. The transfer van carried them over to Pad B, Launch Complex 39, where their spacecraft awaited them. Liftoff for the lunar orbit mission was at 12:49 p.m., May 18, 1969.

The first stage of the Saturn 505 launch vehic…

The first stage of the Saturn 505 launch vehicle being prepared for erection in the high bay area of the Kennedy Space Center’s  Vehicle Assembly Building. Saturn 505 is the launch vehicle for the Apollo 10 mission.

Interior view of the Kennedy Space Center&rsqu…

Interior view of the Kennedy Space Center’s Manned Spacecraft Operations Building showing Apollo Spacecraft 106/Command/Service Module being moved to integrated work stand number one for mating to Spacecraft Lunar Module Adapter (SLA) 13 on January 31st, 1969 for the flight of Apollo 10 in May 1969. 

A view of the smooth terrain in the general ar…

A view of the smooth terrain in the general area of the North Ray Crater geological site, photographed by the Apollo 16 crew- John Young & Charlie Duke- from the Lunar Roving Vehicle. The RCA color television camera is mounted on the front of the LRV and can be seen in the foreground, along with a small part of the high gain antenna, upper left. The tracks were made on the earlier trip to the North Ray Crater site.

(18 May 1969) — A technician attaches ho…

(18 May 1969) — A technician attaches hose from test stand to spacesuit of astronaut John W. Young, Apollo 10 command module pilot, during final suiting operations for the Apollo 10 lunar orbit mission. Another technician makes adjustment behind Young. Minutes later astronauts Young; Thomas P. Stafford, commander; and Eugene A. Cernan, lunar module pilot, rode a transfer van from the Kennedy Space Center’s Manned Spacecraft Operations Building over to Pad B, Launch Complex 39, where their spacecraft awaited them. Liftoff was at 12:49 p.m. (EDT), May 18, 1969.

(April 1972) — An oblique view of a port…

(April 1972) — An oblique view of a portion of the lunar nearside as photographed from the Apollo 16 spacecraft in lunar orbit, looking across the Sea of Crises southwesterly into the Sea of Tranquility. The conspicuous, bright-rayed crater is Proclus. The crater Taruntius in the northeasterly portion of the Sea of Fertility is near the left center edge. A portion of the Sea of Serenity is visible on the horizon at upper right.

(23 March 1965) — Distant view showing t…

(23 March 1965) — Distant view showing the successful launching of the first manned Gemini flight. The Gemini-Titan 3 (GT-3) lifted off Pad 19, at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) at 9:24 a.m. (EST), March 23, 1965. The Gemini-3 spacecraft “Molly Brown” carried astronauts Virgil I. Grissom, command pilot, and John W. Young, pilot, on three successful orbits of Earth.

(19 April 1972) — Apollo 16 astronauts c…

(19 April 1972) — Apollo 16 astronauts captured this Earth rise scene with a handheld Hasselblad camera during the second revolution of the moon. Identifiable craters seen on the moon include Saha, Wyld, and Saenger. Much of the terrain seen here is never visible from Earth, as the Command Module (CM) was just passing onto what is known as the dark side or far side of the moon. Crewmen aboard the CM at the time the photo was made were astronauts John W. Young, Thomas K. Mattingly II and Charles M. Duke Jr. Mattingly remained later with the CM in lunar orbit while Young and Duke descended in the lunar module (LM) to explore the surface of the moon. 

(18 May 1969) — The Apollo 10 Lunar Modu…

(18 May 1969) — The Apollo 10 Lunar Module, still attached to the Saturn IVB stage, is seen in this color reproduction taken from the first television transmission made by the color television camera aboard the Apollo 10 spacecraft. This picture was made following CSM/LM-S-IVB separation, and prior to LM extraction from the S-IVB. The Command and Service Modules were making the docking approach to the LM/S-IVB. The circular object is the docking drogue assembly on the LM. Aboard the Command Module were astronauts Thomas P. Stafford, commander; John W. Young, command module pilot; and Eugene A. Cernan, lunar module pilot.