Category: tom stafford

This photograph of the moon was taken after tr…

This photograph of the moon was taken after trans-Earth insertion when the Apollo 10 spacecraft was high above the lunar equator near 27 degrees east longitude. North is about 20 degrees left of the top of the photograph. Apollo Landing Site 3 is on the lighted side of the terminator in a dark area just north of the equator. Apollo Landing Site 2 is near the lower left margin of the Sea of Tranquility (Mare Tranquillitatis), which is the large, dark area near the center of the photograph.

The Apollo 10 crew leaves the Kennedy Space Ce…

The Apollo 10 crew leaves the Kennedy Space Center’s Manned Spacecraft Operations Building during the Apollo 10 prelaunch countdown. Leading is John Young, command module pilot, followed by Tom Stafford, commander; and Gene Cernan, lunar module pilot. The transfer van carried them over to Pad B, Launch Complex 39, where their spacecraft awaited them. Liftoff for the lunar orbit mission was at 12:49 p.m., May 18, 1969.

The first stage of the Saturn 505 launch vehic…

The first stage of the Saturn 505 launch vehicle being prepared for erection in the high bay area of the Kennedy Space Center’s  Vehicle Assembly Building. Saturn 505 is the launch vehicle for the Apollo 10 mission.

Interior view of the Kennedy Space Center&rsqu…

Interior view of the Kennedy Space Center’s Manned Spacecraft Operations Building showing Apollo Spacecraft 106/Command/Service Module being moved to integrated work stand number one for mating to Spacecraft Lunar Module Adapter (SLA) 13 on January 31st, 1969 for the flight of Apollo 10 in May 1969. 

(April 1969) — Two members of the Apollo…

(April 1969) — Two members of the Apollo 10 prime crew participate in simulation activity at the Kennedy Space Center during preparations for their scheduled lunar orbit mission. Astronaut Thomas P. Stafford, commander, is in the background; and in the foreground is astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, lunar module pilot. The two crewmen are in the Lunar Module Mission Simulator.

(16 Dec. 1965) — Crewmen of the aircraft…

(16 Dec. 1965) — Crewmen of the aircraft carrier USS Wasp gather on deck to watch the recovery of the Gemini-6 spacecraft and astronauts. The Gemini spacecraft is being hoisted along the side of the ship by crane. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

(18 May 1969) — The Apollo 10 Lunar Modu…

(18 May 1969) — The Apollo 10 Lunar Module, still attached to the Saturn IVB stage, is seen in this color reproduction taken from the first television transmission made by the color television camera aboard the Apollo 10 spacecraft. This picture was made following CSM/LM-S-IVB separation, and prior to LM extraction from the S-IVB. The Command and Service Modules were making the docking approach to the LM/S-IVB. The circular object is the docking drogue assembly on the LM. Aboard the Command Module were astronauts Thomas P. Stafford, commander; John W. Young, command module pilot; and Eugene A. Cernan, lunar module pilot.

(19 May 1969) — Astronaut John W. Young,…

(19 May 1969) — Astronaut John W. Young, Apollo 10 command module pilot, displays a drawing of Snoopy in this color reproduction taken from the fourth telecast made by the color television camera aboard the Apollo 10 spacecraft. When this picture was made the Apollo 10 spacecraft was about halfway to the moon, or approximately 112,000 nautical miles from Earth. Snoopy will be the code name of the Lunar Module (LM) during Apollo 10 operations when the Command Module (CM) and LM are separated. The CM’s code name will be Charlie Brown. Also, aboard Apollo 10 were astronauts Thomas P. Stafford, commander; and Eugene A. Cernan, lunar module pilot.

Astronauts of the Apollo Missions Part 1/2 

Astronauts of the Apollo Missions Part 1/2 

humanoidhistory: December 8, 1965 – Gemini 6 a…

humanoidhistory:

December 8, 1965 – Gemini 6 astronauts Tom Stafford and Wally Schirra go through a flight simulation atop Launch Complex 19 at Cape Canaveral, Florida, prior to launch on December 15.

(NASA)